GASTROPATHY DIABETIC PDF

Dig Dis Sci. Diabetic gastropathy: gastric neuromuscular dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: a review of symptoms, pathophysiology, and treatment. Koch KL 1. Diabetic gastropathy is a term that encompasses a number of neuromuscular dysfunctions of the stomach, including abnormalities of gastric contractility, tone, and myoelectrical activity in patients with diabetes. These abnormalities range from tachygastrias to antral hypomotility and frank gastroparesis. Diabetic gastropathies may be acutely produced during hyperglycemia.

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Dig Dis Sci. Diabetic gastropathy: gastric neuromuscular dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: a review of symptoms, pathophysiology, and treatment. Koch KL 1. Diabetic gastropathy is a term that encompasses a number of neuromuscular dysfunctions of the stomach, including abnormalities of gastric contractility, tone, and myoelectrical activity in patients with diabetes. These abnormalities range from tachygastrias to antral hypomotility and frank gastroparesis.

Diabetic gastropathies may be acutely produced during hyperglycemia. Symptoms of chronic diabetic gastropathy include chronic nausea, vague epigastric discomfort, postprandial fullness, early satiety, and vomiting.

Because these symptoms are nonspecific, other disorders such as mechanical obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, mesenteric ischemia, and drug effects should be considered. Neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach may be assessed noninvasively with gastric emptying tests, electrogastrography, and ultrasound. Diet and glucose control also are important in the management of diabetic gastropathy.

As the pathophysiology of diabetic gastropathy is better understood, more specific and improved treatments will evolve.

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Gastropathy 101

Gastropathy has many possible causes. Conditions that sometimes lead to gastropathy include: Gastritis Gastritis is inflammation of the lining of your stomach. However, it can also arise from excessive alcohol consumption and certain medications. It can come on slowly or quickly and, when left untreated, may cause stomach ulcers. Gastroparesis is often associated with neurological damage caused by chronic conditions, such as diabetes. Gastroenteritis Gastroenteritis is another word for a stomach bug or stomach flu.

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Treatment of Patients With Diabetic Gastroparesis

Flatulence can also be a symptom of gastropathy. Blood in the stool. Common Disorders of Stomach Diarrhea: The undigested food travels to the colon and large intestine in a liquid form where the water gets absorbed by these organs thus turning the food into a more solid form. Different bacteria or viruses cause increase in the quantity of liquid, which is secreted and that moves very fast through the digestive tract before the water can be absorbed properly. This leads to diarrhea. Diarrhea is of two types: Acute diarrhea which can last for a few days to a week. Chronic diarrhea, which can be present for many days or for even longer duration for up to a few weeks.

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Gastropathy: Types, Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis

Differential Diagnosis When taking a patient history, clinicians should question the patient carefully about all associated gastrointestinal symptoms and ascertain the duration, severity, and precise nature of each symptom. Although diabetic gastropathy is most common in patients with long-standing insulin-dependent diabetes, it also occurs in patients who do not require insulin and in those in whom diabetes has been only recently diagnosed. It should be noted, however, that many patients with type 2 diabetes may have had the condition for many years before diagnosis. Diabetic gastropathy is frequently associated with other diabetic complications, such as retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. Thus, it can be helpful to determine the degree of neuropathy in other systems. Other components of the medical history include a careful drug history to rule out use of narcotics, tricyclic antidepressants, anticholinergics, and other agents that can slow gastric motility as listed in Table 2. Physical Examination A complete physical examination should include a focus on malnutrition, obstruction, and the presence of a succussion splash.

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