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JUnit Platform Test Kit 1. Example Projects To see complete, working examples of projects that you can copy and experiment with, the junit5-samples repository is a good place to start. The junit5-samples repository hosts a collection of sample projects based on JUnit Jupiter, JUnit Vintage, and other testing frameworks. The links below highlight some of the combinations you can choose from. For Gradle and Java, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-gradle project. For Gradle and Kotlin, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-gradle-kotlin project.

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JUnit Platform Test Kit 1. Example Projects To see complete, working examples of projects that you can copy and experiment with, the junit5-samples repository is a good place to start. The junit5-samples repository hosts a collection of sample projects based on JUnit Jupiter, JUnit Vintage, and other testing frameworks.

The links below highlight some of the combinations you can choose from. For Gradle and Java, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-gradle project. For Gradle and Kotlin, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-gradle-kotlin project. For Gradle and Groovy, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-gradle-groovy project.

For Maven, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-maven project. For Ant, check out the junit5-jupiter-starter-ant project. Writing Tests The following example provides a glimpse at the minimum requirements for writing a test in JUnit Jupiter.

Subsequent sections of this chapter will provide further details on all available features. A first test case import static org. Calculator; import org. Annotations JUnit Jupiter supports the following annotations for configuring tests and extending the framework. Unless otherwise stated, all core annotations are located in the org.

Annotation Description Test Denotes that a method is a test method. Such methods are inherited unless they are overridden. ParameterizedTest Denotes that a method is a parameterized test. RepeatedTest Denotes that a method is a test template for a repeated test.

TestFactory Denotes that a method is a test factory for dynamic tests. TestTemplate Denotes that a method is a template for test cases designed to be invoked multiple times depending on the number of invocation contexts returned by the registered providers. Such annotations are inherited. TestInstance Used to configure the test instance lifecycle for the annotated test class.

DisplayName Declares a custom display name for the test class or test method. Such annotations are not inherited. DisplayNameGeneration Declares a custom display name generator for the test class. Such methods are inherited unless they are hidden or overridden and must be static unless the "per-class" test instance lifecycle is used.

Nested Denotes that the annotated class is a non-static nested test class. BeforeAll and AfterAll methods cannot be used directly in a Nested test class unless the "per-class" test instance lifecycle is used. Tag Used to declare tags for filtering tests , either at the class or method level; analogous to test groups in TestNG or Categories in JUnit 4.

Such annotations are inherited at the class level but not at the method level. Timeout Used to fail a test, test factory, test template, or lifecycle method if its execution exceeds a given duration. ExtendWith Used to register extensions declaratively. RegisterExtension Used to register extensions programmatically via fields.

Such fields are inherited unless they are shadowed. TempDir Used to supply a temporary directory via field injection or parameter injection in a lifecycle method or test method; located in the org. Some annotations may currently be experimental. Consult the table in Experimental APIs for details. That means that you can define your own composed annotation that will automatically inherit the semantics of its meta-annotations. For example, instead of copying and pasting Tag "fast" throughout your code base see Tagging and Filtering , you can create a custom composed annotation named Fast as follows.

Fast can then be used as a drop-in replacement for Tag "fast". ElementType; import java. Retention; import java. RetentionPolicy; import java. Target; import org. Tag; import org. Test; Target ElementType. Test Classes and Methods Test Class: any top-level class, static member class, or Nested class that contains at least one test method. Test classes must not be abstract and must have a single constructor.

Test methods and lifecycle methods may be declared locally within the current test class, inherited from superclasses, or inherited from interfaces see Test Interfaces and Default Methods.

In addition, test methods and lifecycle methods must not be abstract and must not return a value. Test classes, test methods, and lifecycle methods are not required to be public, but they must not be private.

The following test class demonstrates the use of Test methods and all supported lifecycle methods. A standard test class import static org. AfterAll; import org.

AfterEach; import org. BeforeAll; import org. BeforeEach; import org. Disabled; import org. Display Names Test classes and test methods can declare custom display names via DisplayName — with spaces, special characters, and even emojis — that will be displayed in test reports and by test runners and IDEs.

DisplayName; import org. Values provided via DisplayName annotations always take precedence over display names generated by a DisplayNameGenerator. Method; import org. DisplayNameGeneration; import org.

DisplayNameGenerator; import org. Nested; import org. Test; import org. ParameterizedTest; import org. Just like for display name generators configured via the DisplayNameGeneration annotation, the supplied class has to implement the DisplayNameGenerator interface. The default display name generator will be used for all tests unless the DisplayNameGeneration annotation is present on an enclosing test class or test interface.

For example, to use the ReplaceUnderscores display name generator by default, you should set the configuration parameter to the corresponding fully qualified class name e. In summary, the display name for a test class or method is determined according to the following precedence rules: value of the DisplayName annotation, if present by calling the DisplayNameGenerator specified in the DisplayNameGeneration annotation, if present by calling the default DisplayNameGenerator configured via the configuration parameter, if present by calling org.

Standard 2. Assertions JUnit Jupiter comes with many of the assertion methods that JUnit 4 has and adds a few that lend themselves well to being used with Java 8 lambdas. All JUnit Jupiter assertions are static methods in the org.

Assertions class. CountDownLatch; import example. Person; import example. This behavior can lead to undesirable side effects if the code that is executed within the executable or supplier relies on java.

ThreadLocal storage. One common example of this is the transactional testing support in the Spring Framework. Consequently, if an executable or supplier provided to assertTimeoutPreemptively invokes Spring-managed components that participate in transactions, any actions taken by those components will not be rolled back with the test-managed transaction. On the contrary, such actions will be committed to the persistent store e.

Similar side effects may be encountered with other frameworks that rely on ThreadLocal storage. Kotlin Assertion Support JUnit Jupiter also comes with a few assertion methods that lend themselves well to being used in Kotlin. All JUnit Jupiter Kotlin assertions are top-level functions in the org. Person import example. Calculator import java. Duration import org. Test import org.

Third-party Assertion Libraries Even though the assertion facilities provided by JUnit Jupiter are sufficient for many testing scenarios, there are times when more power and additional functionality such as matchers are desired or required. In such cases, the JUnit team recommends the use of third-party assertion libraries such as AssertJ , Hamcrest , Truth , etc. Developers are therefore free to use the assertion library of their choice.

For example, the combination of matchers and a fluent API can be used to make assertions more descriptive and readable. Assert class which accepts a Hamcrest Matcher. Instead, developers are encouraged to use the built-in support for matchers provided by third-party assertion libraries. The following example demonstrates how to use the assertThat support from Hamcrest in a JUnit Jupiter test.

As long as the Hamcrest library has been added to the classpath, you can statically import methods such as assertThat , is , and equalTo and then use them in tests like in the assertWithHamcrestMatcher method below.

Assert assertThat.

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Introduction

Last Published: Mar About DbUnit DbUnit is a JUnit extension also usable with Ant targeted at database-driven projects that, among other things, puts your database into a known state between test runs. This is an excellent way to avoid the myriad of problems that can occur when one test case corrupts the database and causes subsequent tests to fail or exacerbate the damage. DbUnit has the ability to export and import your database data to and from XML datasets. Since version 2. DbUnit can also help you to verify that your database data match an expected set of values. News Please try the 2.

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JUnit 5 User Guide

This means you must create a dataset. In most situations you will work with xml datasets. You can manually create a flat XML dataset from scratch or create one by exporting some data from your database. A template method is required to be implemented: getDataSet to return the dataset you created in step 1. The simplest way to configure it would be in the constructor of your test class. You may modify this behavior by overriding getDatabaseTester , using one of the other 3 provided IDatabaseTester implementations or your own. DefaultPrepAndExpectedTestCase uses a configurable IDatabaseTester allowing any connection type providing a turn-key test setup and verification process in one, with clear separation of prep and expected datasets.

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I think this is a very good text about this subject. Hopefully he gave me the permission to present excerpts from his notes here. The original text is much longer and I strongly suggest you to read it as well. See resources for reference to it. How can you put tests in place to make sure your code really is reading and writing the right data from the database?

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